The
Inspiration
Project

WITH BRENDAN CORR

GUEST Tim Mannah

Tim Mannah

Episode 31

Tim Mannah: Episode Description:

On this episode of ‘The Inspiration Project’, Brendan Corr talks to Tim Mannah the former Captain of the Parramatta Eels about how growing up in a Christian Family and in Church helped shape his decisions on and off the Football field. Plus who made the biggest impacts in his life and an encouragement to young people about living for God.

Among other things Tim shares:

  • How Tim got started playing rugby league
  • Key people that helped shape Tim’s life
  • What it was like for Tim growing up
  • When and how God saved Tim
  • The importance of faith in Tim’s life
  • Tim’s life-changing commitments on and off the field
  • Adjusting to life after retirement from professional rugby league
  • The importance of education and studying
  • What is next for Tim Mannah?

Tim Mannah: Episode Transcript

Sponsor Announcement
This podcast is sponsored by Australian Christian College, a network of schools committed to student wellbeing, character development and academic improvement.

Introduction
Welcome to The Inspiration Project where well-known Christians share their stories to inspire young people in their faith and life. Here’s your host, Brendan Corr.

Brendan Corr
Hi, everybody. Welcome to another episode of The Inspiration Project, the podcast where we’re sharing stories of people of faith who have found success in their careers and the way in which faith has carried them through from that transition from being kids at school to successful thriving adults. So delighted to be welcoming our guest this morning. This is a name that will be known to most of you, I think. Tim Mannah is one of the stalwarts of those who follow Rugby League, a character in that profession who was well-regarded universally, even though Eels fans have a special place in their heart for Tim. He was a guy, one of the players who was respected across the different fan bases and continues to be a man of respect. We’re going to find out a little bit exactly what it was that carried him through his NRL career and what he’s up to now. Tim, welcome to The Inspiration Project.

Tim Mannah
Thank you for having me. It’s an honour to be here.

Brendan Corr
We have known you for over probably a decade. I think it was about 2009 when you first pulled on the blue and gold jersey in a first-grade context. Would that have been about right? 2009?

Tim Mannah
Yeah, debuted 2009. That’s a lifetime ago now.

Brendan Corr
What was that like to run out onto your first game of first-grade NRL?

Tim Mannah
My first game was actually over in New Zealand. It was actually good to be away from all the hype and the noise, so I didn’t get too nervous. My brother and a couple of friends came out to watch it and it was nice. We didn’t get the win but it was just a really cool way to start your career. We stayed in the same hotel actually as the Indian cricket team.

Brendan Corr
Is that right?

Tim Mannah
Yeah. That was my first taste of professional sport and staying in the hotel with them. We were over in Auckland, and I think there were about 300 people camped outside our hotel that whole time, just waiting to get a glimpse of the Indian cricket team. It was pretty good. It was pretty cool. I still remember Nathan Hindmarsh ran down to a sports store and grabbed a cricket bat to get Sachin Tendulkar to sign it.

Brendan Corr
You were doing some of the fan stuff as well, huh?

Tim Manna
Yeah, we’re fans of the cricket team. But, yeah, it’s good to get out and see a new player over there, I guess. It was a good experience.

Brendan Corr
Let me wind you back. Because that’s a big day, run out against the Warriors in New Zealand, your first game of rugby. But that obviously was the beginning. Well, it’s really not the beginning. It was the midpoint of a career in sport or in a life of sport that must have had quite a story leading up to that point. Can you tell us a bit about when did you realise that Rugby League was going to be a special area of investment for you and energy?

Tim Mannah
I started off playing soccer when I was a kid. So about 12. I don’t know if my body was fully- I don’t know if my body was fully suited more to League but yeah, I used to love playing footy in the backyard with my family and cousins and brothers. So I started when I was 13. I’m lucky enough to get picked up by Parramatta as a 14-year-old and just…

Brendan Corr
So you started rugby at 13 and got picked up as a prospect at 14?

Tim Manna
Yeah, that was pretty fortunate. I got picked up early.

Brendan Corr
Fast learner.

Tim Mannah
Well, like I said, it was always in our DNA. We love playing. Throughout my whole childhood we played a lot in the backyard. I love the sport. So I got trained through the Parramatta system. But it wasn’t.

Brendan Corr
Must have been that high school coach then. It must have been Mr. Brummel that high school coach…

Tim Mannah
Yeah, Gary Brummel. He was one of the greatest school principals you could have asked for. He was incredible. Really grateful for him. But also I’m extremely grateful for Mr. Jackson. Mr. Jackson was our PE teacher. He coached a lot as well. I learned some lessons from a young age that Jacko taught us that throughout my whole career that helped me massively. It’s even small things, like our school team motto was Isaiah 40-30. And we used to always talk about wings of eagles before a game at school footy, and throughout my whole career it just became a thing. I used to like to read Isaiah 40, 28, 31 before I played every game. Then I had it memorised. So usually before I ran out to the field before every game, I just memorised it and just said it to myself in my head.

Brendan Corr
That’s awesome.

Tim Mannah
Just little things like that that you learn from people like Mr. Jackson and the guidance of the principal, like Mr. Brummel. I’m really grateful to this day to have people like that in my life that really shaped me as the kind of person I became.

Brendan Corr
I want to circle back to that and about the role of key people in your development, and not just your skill level, but your character development. But let me roll you back. You mentioned that you loved playing footy in the backyard with your family. Tell us about your family, your Lebanese family, renowned to have close knit families. What was it like growing up?

Tim Mannah
Mr. Brummel will know, probably, a bit about our family, because there was one stage where there was a Mannah in every single year from seven to 12 at the school. So yeah I was one of four boys. Around the corner, we had our cousins, who are Mannahs as well, and they had six boys. So…

Brendan Corr
Footy team of your own!

Tim Mannah
Yeah, pretty much. So we were really close. We still see each other. We really enjoyed spending time together. I guess our Lebanese background, our family was everywhere so it would be 11 o’clock at night we’d be sitting at home, someone would just walk in the house uninvited and just have a good laugh, and it was really good.

Brendan Corr
Uninvited…

Tim Mannah
Exactly. Yeah, correct. So we were always in each other’s pockets, we were always around each other. I think, looking back now, I was really grateful that we had that opportunity to grow close to each other.

Brendan Corr
That is a great thing when you can enjoy family relationships. So, Tim, faith has obviously been a part of your life. Was that something that you were introduced to through your family or did that happen something separately? How did you come to that?

Tim Mannah
Yeah, well, apparently my mum brought me to church the very week I was born. So I was pretty much brought up as much as put in church. My mum’s brother was a pastor of the church I grew up in. The history of that is there was a pastor in America, Richard Hester, who had been a missionary from America to Lebanon, started a church in Lebanon, and then the civil war broke out and a lot of people scattered and left the country. My dad and a lot of people that were in the church came to Sydney, so he followed them to Sydney, Australia. They met in my uncle’s house doing church services, and then it grew into a church. That’s kind of the church. It was a huge part of my upbringing, because I talked about my cousins going to school with each other, but, more importantly, we went to church with each other and we’d spent so much time, obviously, every Friday night was at youth and every Sunday and Saturday night, Sunday morning, Sunday night at church. Wednesday we did the prayer meeting. There’d be working bees or something on a Saturday. So I felt like outside of school, church was probably the biggest influence we had. We were very fortunate to grow up in a Christian home and have those values instilled in us at a young age.

Brendan Corr
When did it become your faith Tim? It’s one thing to grow up with a family in that culture and that community, but it seems that at some point you found your own relationship with Jesus. How did that happen?

Tim Mannah
I was about 12 or 13 and I was in this Sunday school class. To be honest, it was the old turn or burn sermon that got me. I heard a bit about hell, and I remember thinking, I don’t want to go there. And in Sunday school that’s when I decided to make a decision to ask God to come into my life and be my Saviour. As a 12 or 13-year-old, I wouldn’t say my life changed dramatically. It wasn’t like I was down the beaten path and completely turned my life around. I felt like life was pretty similar, but as much as things didn’t change, I think everything changed, I guess, because I got to have the Holy spirit inside of me and do life and just took my faith to another level. So I felt very fortunate to be able to have that happen at a young age and have that journey with God throughout my childhood as well as my adolescent years, which really helped shape the person I became as well.

Brendan Corr
That’s so true, isn’t it? And you’re right about that. You become a Christian early or later in life and there’s stuff to work out, isn’t there? Life still happens and you’ve got to work things out. How does faith make a difference for me as a 14, 15-year-old or as a 20-year-old or 30-year-old? And then as a 50-year-old. What’s the importance of it? Rugby League is probably not recognised as the sort of environment where it’s probably easy to be a Christian. What was it like for you as the 14 or 15-year-old with a faith that you wanted to be true to coming into a culture that wasn’t focused on your faith but on your performance, your value to the club, the reward that you could bring for them? How was that for you?

Tim Mannah
We kind of touched on that a bit earlier, I guess, the environment that you surround yourself in. I had a good environment. I was kind of wrapped in cotton wool as a kid. I went to my pastor in the church. I went to church a lot. I grew up in a Christian home, I went to a Christian school. I wasn’t really excited about doing a whole lot until footy became more real. So I was kind of a 14-year-old, and then as you turn 15, 16, you’re at the age where most people, most kids in your life start discovering parties and alcohol and girls. Obviously, growing up with the background I did, I made some commitments to myself that I wanted to stick by, things like not having sex before I was married, not taking the drugs, and not be someone that gets drunk and all those things I didn’t want to do. While they were very challenging at a young age because there’s a lot of peer pressure. Choosing what kind of man I wanted to become later, those decisions… Obviously, if I’m talking to high school students, they’re in that stage now where I was where the decisions I made in high school turned me into the man I became. Because when I started playing NRL years later at the same club where I made these decisions, nothing was hard because they all knew my standards and my morals, and everyone just accepted that that’s who I was. People would say, “Timmy doesn’t do that. Don’t bother asking him.” It made my transition so much smoother because of choices I made as a 16, 17-year-old.

Brendan Corr
That is so good. That is a very bit of wise counsel. You make some smaller decisions early and it makes the bigger decisions a bit easier, right?

Tim Mannah
Yeah, correct.

Brendan Corr
Once you know who I am, this is what I stand for. It’s an interesting thing, because I think you’re also right, Tim, is that while we might be fearful that others can reject us if we make some of those decisions based on our Christian faith, more often than not, they respect that. Other people respect that that’s who you are. You’ve got some principles that are informing those decisions. Is that sort of how it was for you? Did they know the reasons for the decisions you were making?

Tim Mannah
Yeah, absolutely. I was pretty vocal about it at the time as well. Everyone knew about my faith. Everyone knew why I was doing what I was doing. At the start of my career, probably a bit different than it is now. Back then, I brushed past Brad Finch yesterday talking about how it was an old saying that don’t trust anyone that doesn’t drink. That was the culture back then. But I feel like the culture has really shifted and it’s much easier now for people to make these stands because it’s very respected and very well-embraced. I think Looking back now at the you know Jason Stevens, the people that I saw that shared their faith, before anyone else did and they had a couple of most hits but that’s made it so much easier now, and there’s a lot of Christians now in the sport that are more vocal and praying on the field and having bible studies at training. It’s really embraced and encouraged.

Brendan Corr
I wanted to picture that, because I think you mentioned the shift in culture. That is such a true thing to notice, the little prayer groups that form after games in circles and take the knee and pray together. It seemed to me, I might not be right, but you were part of that sort of becoming a thing, right?

Tim Mannah
Yeah. So I know we used to cop a bit of flack when we started because some fans didn’t like the idea of us praying with the opposition, especially after we had a loss, but it was always about the bigger picture. It was never about the game of footy. It was more about giving honour where it was due and trying to glorify God with the platform we had. So it’s really exciting to see that it’s still going to this day. Like I said, I think that society and sport are shifting in a way where embracing, not just your faith, it’s a lot more embracing of what country you come from. I feel like everyone’s a lot more accepting. And most clubs now have a club chaplain, which was not the standard back in the day, but you’d be hard pressed to find a club without a chaplain now. So it’s definitely taken a shift, and it’s one for the better, I think.

Brendan Corr
Yeah, I agree. And just as a bit of a personal reflection, when you guys showed the courage to step into that sort of space, the encouragement it was to Christians looking on, I know it was a witness to the world. It really did do Christians a world of good to see you guys come together, arms on shoulders, and honour the Creator in that sort of space. So thank you for being part of the response to that. It’s been fantastic. Let me take you back. I’m interested to know, you’re a young guy. Obviously, you’re quite athletic as you’re growing up and you’re playing soccer. You mentioned about your physicality being better suited to this particular sport. Let me ask you about what it’s like for a young person to find their thing, to be at that stage where you get into the thing, “This is what I’m good at, this is what I want to do, my passion.” How did you get that sense of clarity around, “I’ve got options, but this is my thing”?

Tim Mannah
It’s weird. Now, I’ve moved into retirement into the corporate world. I always tell people that I overachieved as a footy player. Because always growing up I was always more of an intellect than an athlete. I always considered myself to be smarter than I was athletic. And by God’s grace, I was able to manage a career in sport. But this next chapter in the corporate world is something that I feel comfortable in and something that I’m really looking forward to and something that I enjoy. Certain purposes of the sports world, I look back at how much it’s blessed me but I’m excited about the next chapter. I’ve spent my whole career studying a sports business degree, I did financial planning, at the time, I did my real estate licence. I’m doing my brokerage course. Throughout the course of my whole career I’ve always studied.

Brendan Corr
Yeah, that’s wonderful.

Tim Mannah
I was always ready for retirement.

Brendan Corr
Was that something … Did the club put you through those things?

Tim Mannah
Well, they made a rule later on that if you’re in the twenties programme, you have to be doing apprenticeship or studying. So that was a rule. But at the moment, if you look at our sport, there’s probably 80% of people who aren’t doing much at all. A lot of my education was paid for so I really took advantage of that. It definitely helped the transition post-footy to be a lot smoother.

Brendan Corr
Yeah, indeed. Because, again, it’s part of the issue, isn’t it? As a sportsman, you’ve got a window where you’re going to be able to take the heavy knocks and physically perform. What happens after that? You were always thinking ahead in that sort of space?

Tim Mannah
Yeah. I was always planning ahead. I spent the last 3 years of my career doing a transition programme, where I’d work one day a week with the club and they’d teach me about the commercial world and who our sponsors were and what’s involved with sponsorship. I was always intrigued with that step. And then when I retired, I took a role with the commercial team working with our sponsors at Parramatta.

Brendan Corr
Super. So you’re still involved in the community in some way, in the Rugby League community, but in a different sort of capacity.

Tim Mannah
Exactly, yes. I still got my foot in the door. I’m still passionate about the club. I love the place. So it’s nice to have that association with the club, but also be able to just do something that I’m passionate about as well outside of rugby.

Brendan Corr
You must have been… I don’t want to say “must have been”. It sounds as though you must have been the sort of guy that was highly organised and managed all the different things that were going on for you, school, sport, training, study for future career. Is that an aspect of your personality, that you can manage a lot of balls in the air?

Tim Mannah
Yeah. Well, I probably have a bit of OCD. I like to organise, I like things to be in order, which me and Jarryd Hayne always joke about, because he’s the opposite. So growing up with him was always frustrating. I like to get somewhere a half an hour early, he liked to get there half an hour late. But, yeah, I’m definitely a man that likes order and things to be organised.

Brendan Corr
That’s good. And that serves you well, because it brings a sense of discipline to your training and your preparation and future thinking. It’s some of the things that have crept into Rugby League, where the teams are very organised. Everyone has a role to play. It’s a bit more structured. That was sort of your approach?

Tim Mannah
They say when you retire the biggest thing is to try to keep some kind of structure in your life. Because as an athlete you’ve spent the last 11 years of your life being told exactly what time to be, where to be at, when to eat, when to sleep. So just being so structured in your life. A lot of the players retire and they go from having that to not knowing what to do with themselves, and they lose a bit of a sense of purpose. So, luckily, for me, I’ve always enjoyed having that kind of structure in my life, even to this day. Now, I wake up, go to the gym, and go to coffee. I’ve got a whole routine. I like to keep doing it. It’s really helped making sure there’s not a huge gap post football with how I do my day.

Brendan Corr
Do you miss the playing, Tim? Is that something that you wish you could pull the boots on again and live the glory days?

Tim Mannah
I get asked that all the time and my answer is no. There’s some things I miss. The feeling after a win, going to the sheds after the win, that night going home, that’s a greatest feeling. But 95% of it, I don’t miss at all. And I became captain of the club when I was 25. I think things changed a lot once that happened. Pre being captain, pre being a 25-year-old, I was the young kid on the block, who was playing well and had no responsibility. And then once they put a title or a tag on your name, it changes a lot. The expectation, the responsibility and pressure comes along with that. I’m not saying I didn’t enjoy it, but it’s just a different kind of enjoyment. You wear a lot of the hits and you feel a lot of the losses a lot more when you have that responsibility on you. I was ready to finish up when I did.

Brendan Corr
The transition is, I guess, a question you get asked a lot, but the jump from regular Rugby League at a club level to State Of Origin, what’s it like to make that sort of step into the State Of Origin Football?

Tim Mannah
It was awesome. I just remember it being so fast. I was there to play a game with Craig as coach. That first year I came in, it was game three. We lost the first two. So I came into a bit of a morbid camp. The series was already over when I got in there. The series was over when I got there and they were just ready to fail. Whereas, the following year, I played the whole series with Ricky Stuart, and that camp was incredible. It was the best experience. It was just new coaching staff, new players, new energy. We really had a crack. We almost won that series and it was great to be a part of it. I just remember the whole experience, it’s like NRL on steroids. It’s just huge. To build up that excitement, how many people get involved. People who don’t even like Rugby League jumping on board and supporting it. It’s really cool.

Brendan Corr
Yeah, it is. For the camps of New South Wales and Queensland, at least, it is the pinnacle of interest, isn’t it, in the sport? And I think you’re right. The State of Origin, especially if there’s a great contest, it’s a good win. Tim, I want to use that as a launching point. You’ve spent the bulk of your last 10 years or so, and beyond that, being involved in a sport that was every week win or lose, every season success or failure, the confronting notion of how you’re going to deal with those sorts of highs and lows. As a Christian, how did you deal with that issue? How did you deal with being in a community that was riding the rollercoaster of we win, we lose, we’re up, we’re down?

Tim Mannah
I’d be lying if I said it was great from the get-go.The truth of it is, at the start of my career, the first year in NRL, we made it to the final. Throughout all my juniors, we made grand finals, won the competition. So I just assumed success was just normal. And then to have a dry spell where we went bad year, bad year, bad year, early in my career I didn’t handle it well. We’d have a loss and I’d be a bit of a sore loser. I don’t want to speak to anyone, I don’t want to talk to anyone, and not enjoy it then. It kind of got to the stage where I needed to get a balance out of these two. You’re right. It’s an emotional roller coaster and you keep riding it. It’s incredibly unhealthy. And you see so many players riding it these days. Not to get too excited with the wins and not to get too down with the losses and just kind of keep that balance. I’m so glad I learned that lesson before my wife and kids came on board, because I guess I would have been a terrible father and husband during that time, early on in my career. So I’m glad I learned that lesson early on.

Brendan Corr
So how do you balance that though, with having that competitive edge, that sense of, “We don’t tolerate losses, we performed at maximum”? Where’s the line? Or have you found the line? Is there a line?

Tim Mannah
There’s definitely a line. There’s definitely a way you can have a successful mentality and a winning culture without compromising but also handle losses better. I feel like you look at the good coaches out there today and you look at the Wayne Bennett’s. He’s an example because just recently Souths are doing a really good job, and he spoke about starting off winning or losing. He never panicked. He’s just like, “No, no. We’ll be right at the right time” view. And that takes a really good coach that has a lot of confidence in himself and belief in himself to know that. Whereas, a lot of other coaches or players, when they’re losing they’d be feeling the heat and the pressure and just it’s snowballing. But for him to have that belief and knowing what his team can do and not getting down on the losses but knowing that when it matters, I’ll be alright. That’s a great type of character and a great culture.

Brendan Corr
That’s so good. Tim, that’s an interesting point to circle back to one of the points or one of the things you mentioned. I wanted to revisit from the start, and that’s the influence that key people have had in your life. You’re talking about the role of the coach and how important the influence of the coach is. For all the skill that might be assembled in the team, there still needs to be somebody that is bearing some influence in that. Can you reflect a little bit on what you’ve learned or the people that have had that key level of influence, both on your footy and maybe on your character as well?

Tim Mannah
I look back at especially my childhood and I look back at how fortunate I was with the people God put in my life. A lot of my mentors and my leaders and my coaches and my pastors and my youth leaders, a lot of people that really shaped the person I became have been so influential, but they did things that not everyone would have done. So I want to make sure I do the same thing for the next generation coming through as well. But talking about Mr. Jackson and the impact he had in my career, in my life, he was huge. Then I went onto Parramatta and I had a coach, Joey Grima, who I couldn’t have asked for a better junior coach coming through the grades. He isn’t involved with the club now, but he had a huge impact on my career. Things like my turning up early, he instilled that into our sport at a young age. So he trained at a certain time. You got to be there early, 15 minutes to half an hour earlier to prepare, and just instilled those kinds of habits in my life. So even now, if I’ve got a meeting, I like to get there earlier because if you’re on time, you’re late. That was his theory. And then I kept going all the way through. My first coach in NRL was Daniel Anderson, who I learned so much from, and I have a lot of respect for. Just to have people in my life that always helped shape me. Obviously, my parents, my older brother was a great example for me. If we ever got into any mischief, he’s always incredibly straight line. My brothers and I couldn’t have asked for a better example. So I’ve had some great people to look up to. David Figali who a lot of his generation had left the church and he stuck around. And because of him, there are three or four generations of kids coming through that are plugged into the church and can walk with God because he decided to stick around and be an example.

Brendan Corr
That’s so good.

Tim Mannah
For the younger kids. Really grateful for a lot of people in my life. I’ve probably missed a whole bunch of people, but there’s a lot of people that really helped to shape who I am today.

Brendan Corr
The thing that I find interesting is, as you’re reflecting on those, and some of the people who have been charged with the responsibility for training your skill level, your performance in your sport, vocation, but the things that you were reflecting on are not they taught me how to play defence, they taught me how to cover a man, they taught me how to get the best out of me. Talking about the sort of person you’ve become, the things that you hold to be values in your life. I think that’s a wonderful thing for a guy at your point to look back and say, “Yeah, I am who I am by the grace of God, manifested through the different relationships that I’ve had.” That’s terrific. Tim, what’s next for you? What’s on the horizon?

Tim Mannah
Well, I’m at a bit of a crossroads. I’m starting a new career next month, in two weeks. I’m taking a role starting a division for a sponsor of ours. It’s a finance company. I’m starting a new partnership with him. And I’m still going to be working around the club. I’m still involved with the Eels leagues club as an ambassador and investors from a couple other companies, doing a bit of work with Fox still in the media and just kind of floating around. But I’m really excited about the opportunity I’ve got to work with this finance company because he’s been really helping me have a bit of a dream to run it. He’s saying let’s do it as big or as small as you want it to be. So I’m really excited to get stuck into that. And get started.

Brendan Corr
A little bit nerve-wracking to be stepping into something brand new and the uncertainty of all that?

Tim Mannah
Yeah. It is nerve-wracking. At the start of it you’re talking about targets and expectations. There’s a part of me that actually missed all that. I think I’ve had so much pressure on me for 11 years of playing in the NRL, and then just in the last 12 months where I’m really enjoying the transition, but there’s a little bit of pressure. A lot of work I’ve done in the last 12 months is based on Timmy Mannah the brand rather than the work I’m doing. So I’m really excited to be able to have a bit of pressure on me and saying, “This is what we need to deliver. I need you to do it.” So it feels good. I’ve actually missed that. So I’m looking forward to stepping in the ring again and stepping up.

Brendan Corr
Getting into that adrenaline rush, crossing the line, as they say. It’s on. This one’s going to go. It’s all systems in.

Tim Mannah
Yes.

Brendan Corr
Tim, we’ve so much appreciated the time that you’ve been able to give to us. We want to honour you as a man that God has positioned in a really prominent and influential place in our society, that was able to stay true to the call of faith that God made to you, and your response to him and the influence that you had, as I mentioned earlier in our conversation, that spoke to so many people, both those of faith and those challenged to consider the place of God in their life. I pray that you will just as much enjoy what God opens for you in this new season, as you were able to enjoy with your involvement in the footy. Know that we are thinking of, praying for, and hope that it brings every success that God brings to you.

Tim Mannah
I appreciate it so much, mate. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me on.

Brendan Corr
Real pleasure. One last question. How did you feel about the Eels this season?

Tim Mannah
So promising at the start of the year, then this all unfolded a bit at the back but the lovely thing about footy is there’s always next week and there’s always next year.

Brendan Corr
Amen. You’re talking about the highs and lows.

Tim Mannah
Yeah.

Brendan Corr
There’s always next season. Roll the dice again. Tim, thank you so much for your time.

Tim Mannah
Yep. Thanks, mate.

Brendan Corr
God bless you. May He make His face shine upon you and give you peace.

Tim Mannah
Appreciate it. Thanks so much, guys. Cheers.

Tim Mannah

About Tim Mannah

Tim Mannah is a former Lebanon international rugby league footballer who played as a prop for the Parramatta Eels in the NRL. He played for City NSW, New South Wales in the State of Origin series and the Prime Minister's XIII. Mannah played his entire NRL career with Parramatta, attaining the club's captaincy.

Photo of Brendan Corr

About Brendan Corr

Originally a Secondary Science Teacher, Brendan is a graduate of UTS, Deakin and Regent College, Canada. While Deputy Principal at Pacific Hills for 12 years, Brendan also led the NSW Christian Schools Australia registration system. Brendan’s faith is grounded in a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and a deep knowledge of God’s Word. Married for over 30 years, Brendan and Kim have 4 adult children. On the weekends, Brendan enjoys cycling (but he enjoys coffee with his mates afterwards slightly more).